Janet Redman

Author Bio

Janet Redman

Janet is co-director of the Sustainable Energy and Economy Network, where she provides analysis of the international financial institutions’ energy investment and carbon finance activities. Her recent studies on the World Bank’s climate activities include World Bank: Climate Profiteer, and Dirty is the New Clean: A critique of the World Bank’s strategic framework for development and climate change. She has appeared on several radio programs and C-SPAN sharing positive visions for fair and equitable climate action in the United States and overseas. As a founding participant in the global Climate Justice Now! network, Janet is committed to bringing hard-hitting policy analysis into grassroots and grasstops organizing.

Before joining IPS, Janet was a visiting faculty member at the College of the Atlantic and directed the Watershed Initiative of the Center for Applied Human Ecology at the College. Her work in youth and women’s empowerment through community farming and sustainability has brought Janet from coastal Maine to the heart of Worcester, Massachusetts to Bangladesh.

Janet holds a Master’s Degree from Clark University in International Development and Social Change, where she focused her graduate research on regional trade integration in Latin America and the Caribbean. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from the University of Vermont.

Content by this author

The Moment for Climate Justice

As global civil society calls for a renewable energy revolution, the U.S. Congress is considering an African energy initiative that leaves the door wide open to fossil fuels.

The World Bank’s Waste of Energy

Expanding energy access makes sense. What doesn’t make sense is using a failed scheme — like carbon trading — to pay for it.

A Devil’s Bargain on the Climate

Will the Green Climate Fund—the UN body tasked with funding the transition to a clean-energy, climate-resilient future in the developing world—invest in fossil fuels?

Responding to Haiyan: A Typhoon Tax

We need a national climate response to match the scale of the Philippines typhoon and the extreme weather happening in other parts of the world.
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